New Photos

Prize Winners 1966 Snow White 1966 Nativity 1979 Glastonbury Pilgrimage to Lourdes 1994 Mrs Plested's Class 1973

Other

This site is hosted by x10Hosting

The Maple Tree

Paper cutting

Planted in 1984 in the grounds of the Abbey Ruins, the Cappadocian maple commemorates the closing of the Convent school.

On the right is a scan of the original report from the Central Somerset Gazette. The text has been transcribed below. Click on the image for a larger version.

Memory and maple leaves

A maple tree has been planted in Glastonbury Abbey to commemorate St. Louis' Convent School.

St. Louis' Convent School occupied a site opposite the Abbey Ruins for 59 years between 1925 and 1984. Sisters of the order who taught at the school, past pupils and parents were at the ceremony.

The tree is symbolically appropriate because French Canadian sisters worked on the staff of the school in the final years of its life. Also, the Cappadocian maple has leaves which turn rich golden yellow in the autumn. The piping around the old school uniform was gold.

Father Sankey blessed the tree and afterwards there were refreshments at the Abbey School Hall.

(Photo) Sister Francis Teresa of the Order of St. Louis plants a maple tree in the Abbey grounds.

Maple tree 2005

This is the maple tree summer 2005. How it has grown over the past 25 years.

Maple tree plaque

The plaque at the foot of the maple tree. It reads:

Acer cappodoicum aureum, Cappodocian Maple, To commemorate St. Louis Convent School, 1925 - 1984, The Sisters of Charity, past pupils, Staff and Parents.